Neruda, The Wide Ocean and The Poem.

12910556_10154052059089659_1197099060_nOcean, if you were to give, a measure, a ferment, a fruit
of your gifts and destructions, into my hand,
I would choose your far-off repose, your contour of steel,
your vigilant spaces of air and darkness,
and the power of your white tongue,
that shatters and overthrows columns,
breaking them down to your proper purity.

Not the final breaker, heavy with brine,
that thunders onshore, and creates
the silence of sand, that encircles the world,
but the inner spaces of force,
the naked power of the waters,
the immoveable solitude, brimming with lives.
It is Time perhaps, or the vessel filled
with all motion, pure Oneness,
that death cannot touch, the visceral green
of consuming totality.

Only a salt kiss remains of the drowned arm,
that lifts a spray: a humid scent,
of the damp flower, is left,
from the bodies of men. Your energies
form, in a trickle that is not spent,
form, in retreat into silence.

The falling wave,
arch of identity, shattering feathers,
is only spume when it clears,
and returns to its source, unconsumed.

Your whole force heads for its origin.
The husks that your load threshes,
are only the crushed, plundered, deliveries,
that your act of abundance expelled,
all those that take life from your branches.

Your form extends beyond breakers,
vibrant, and rhythmic, like the chest, cloaking
a single being, and its breathings,
that lift into the content of light,
plains raised above waves,
forming the naked surface of earth.
You fill your true self with your substance.
You overflow curve with silence.

The vessel trembles with your salt and sweetness,
the universal cavern of waters,
and nothing is lost from you, as it is
from the desolate crater, or the bay of a hill,
those empty heights, signs, scars,
guarding the wounded air.

Your petals throbbing against the Earth,
trembling your submarine harvests,
your menace thickening the smooth swell,
with pulsations and swarming of schools,
and only the thread of the net raises
the dead lightning of fish-scale,
one wounded millimetre, in the space
of your crystal completeness.

Pablo Neruda (1904-1973)

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Fishing boats, diamonds and all kinds of reflections.

Diamonds
Oil – 100x50cms

This is the only painting I have done for myself where I used the colour yellow. For commissioned paintings I paint whatever I’m asked for, but for some strange reason, whenever I paint to express myself, I don’t even think about this colour. In this case I had no choice because I wanted to paint the typical Maltese fishing boat. I wanted to capture some of my most vivid childhood memories in this one. As a child I used to love staring at their magnetic vibrant colours and used to find myself hypnotized by their lulled movement upon entering the harbour. During another reverie of mine, I was thinking that their reflections looked like shapes of fluid coloured diamonds, and then I thought, aren’t these boats as precious as diamonds? For the fishermen and their families, their only means of income. For the people who love fish especially those who can only eat that.

I had to included some seagulls because I love them and they were cause of many other reveries during childhood. The understated birds. The ones that dance when a storm is coming. The survivors.

luzzu

 

 

 

Ulysses, the day and its events.

Ulysses, the day and the events.
Published in 1922 (full). Approximately 265000 words divided into 18 episodes, and this to describe the happenings of one single day, the 16th of June 1904. Its name is the Latinized name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s epic poem Odyssey. Written by James Joyce, his inspiration came from early childhood after he came across the figure of Odysseus in Adventures of Ulysses (adaption of the Odyssey for children) written by Charles Lamb. He even wrote about the character at school naming it My Favourite Hero.

Many times I read excerpts from it and get distracted by other books but it is now one of my goals for 2016. No matter the controversy and scrutiny of it, it is still worth it.

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